stray cat feeders - need your advice — Brooklynian

stray cat feeders - need your advice

edited 2:34PM in Brooklyn Pets
So I have been feeding my current stray colony for about 7 months. They mainly hang out in an abandoned lot.

When I went to feed tonight I saw that the city had put rat poison in the lot. I fed the cats near the fence, not going into the lot.

The cats know my voice and scent. So I called them over and they came. These cats are not friendly at all, very feral. Has anyone had any experience with moving feeding spots? Any suggestions?

I don't want them to hang out in that lot, but there really aren't any other places to feed them. The lot is between two houses, so I'm sure the homeowners do not want stray cats hanging out in their driveway.

Comments

  • The poison would mainly pose a threat to the cats if they eat a poisoned rat. If you are keeping the cats well-fed, hopefully they will have little incentive to do that.

    I used to take care of a colony where a similar thing happened: one day all those little orange flags appeared, signalling that poisoning was going on. It seemed to have no impact on the cats.

    Have you tried contacting the feral cat colony experts at Neighborhood Cats?
  • Thanks Laura B!

    I just checked the Neighborhood Cats site and they have a workshop tomorrow night (but I can't attend). I will try to attend one of their November ones.

    I will lay out cardboard tonight when I go to feed, so I can get into the lot. I am going to work on building them a shelter as well.
  • Good for you darla!
  • why would you feed the strays? Better for them if you get animal control to corral them. My neighbor feeds them and they use my lawn as their own litter box. the smell is horrible and I now can't let my kids play in the grass in fear of what may be in the grass. I'm not a cat hater but feeding stays will bring more over and then they breed and then you have more...see the cycle? Their feces are as unclean as the rats and it is always a possibility the rats are feeding off the cat feces.

    sorry for the vent but the dozen cats by me cause more trouble than anything
  • calm head, stray cats are primarily the result of owners not spaying/neutering or just plain dumping their cat.

    Stray cats have a very rough life and thus a short life expectancy. If I can show them some love and kindness by taking care of them, I will.

    BTW, I got 2 of the cats in my colony neutered earlier this year through a TNR effort. When there are spots available, I will gladly try getting more of them fixed.
  • Darla, you're a good soul. :)
  • Yes, she is!
  • calm head wrote: why would you feed the strays? Better for them if you get animal control to corral them.
    Not necessarily. Because Animal Control is inundated with unwanted pets, they are forced to euthanize about 40% of them--about 15,000 animals per year in NYC alone! If outdoor cats have sufficient food, shelter, vet care and are neutered, it's possible for them to live quality lives.
    calm head wrote: My neighbor feeds them and they use my lawn as their own litter box. the smell is horrible and I now can't let my kids play in the grass in fear of what may be in the grass.
    http://www.neighborhoodcats.org/info/keepingout.htm
    http://www.alleycat.org/NetCommunity/Page.aspx?pid=375&srcid=298
    calm head wrote: I'm not a cat hater but feeding stays will bring more over and then they breed and then you have more...see the cycle?
    Responsible caretakers of cat colonies (as Darla seems to be) practice the Trap-Neuter-Return (TNR) method. The cats are fixed, so the population shrinks over time, without killing the cats. If you simply remove/kill the cats, more will move in to take their place. TNR is more effective AND more humane.
    calm head wrote: Their feces are as unclean as the rats and it is always a possibility the rats are feeding off the cat feces.
    Cats are one of the most effective rodent deterrents. And unlike with rats, there are ways of controlling where cats defecate (see the links above).
  • well i guess unfortunately for me my neighbor does none of the things those links suggest. She does not TNR them because kittens are there all the time, i hear fighting most summer nights, and the stench of urine on a humid day is nausiating. I have tried those natural remidies to no avail. I even bought powdered fox urine as a repellent because cats supposedly wont hang around where they think foxes are, again didn't work. All I know is she puts out food for them in the early evening, but the cats are there and in my other neighbor's yards all day lounging on garage roofs. C'est la vie!
  • calm head wrote: well i guess unfortunately for me my neighbor does none of the things those links suggest. She does not TNR them because kittens are there all the time, i hear fighting most summer nights, and the stench of urine on a humid day is nausiating. I have tried those natural remidies to no avail. I even bought powdered fox urine as a repellent because cats supposedly wont hang around where they think foxes are, again didn't work. All I know is she puts out food for them in the early evening, but the cats are there and in my other neighbor's yards all day lounging on garage roofs. C'est la vie!
    That's a shame because the fighting, yowling, and urinating would all subside if the cats were fixed--those are the telltale signs of mating cats.

    If it's possible to talk to your neighbor, you may want to let her know that IF she truly cares about cats, trap-neuter-return (TNR) is essential. Allowing the cats to multiply unabated only multiplies the amount of suffering they face due to illness, getting hit by cars, and even foul play at the hands of pissed-off neighbors. Kittens born to street cats have about a 75% mortality rate.

    There is a lot of support out there for people in her situation. The best place to start is Neighborhood Cats (http://www.neighborhoodcats.org/), which trains/coaches people on how to do TNR and offers them free spay/neuter/vaccine clinics. Also good is the NYC Feral Cat Initiative: http://www.animalalliancenyc.org/nycfci/index.php.
  • Subject: Feeding Strays

    How heartless can you be? I feed stray cats all the time.

    I would rather have a cat around me then a crying kid.
    Anyone who would not feed a stray cat or dog is heartless.

    I hope your kids do not grow up hating animals the way you do!
  • excuse me evlwoman. First of all I love animals! I had a dog as a child, 2 cats while I was in college and a dog after I moved in with my now wife. Second of all, although I love animlas I realize that they are just that...animals! Not children. How anyone can say they like animals more than children is beyond me. For all of our sakes, with an attitude like that, I hope and pray you never have children.
  • MOD HERE.

    please remember the rules and be civil, even (especially) towards those you disagree with.

    thank you.
  • New Here.

    Hello everyone, I use to live in Brooklyn, (still a brooklyn girl.LOL) but now on long island, found some ferals in an abanbomed forclosure property. Did the TNR but some of the cats are not so friendly to each other. would love to read some information on ferals. I am a New Feral mommy......LOL

  • Calm Head - Maybe your neighbor doesn't know about TNR and could benefit from some information on the free workshops and services that the city provides. A lot of people don't even know about it. They realize that it's a problem but don't know what to do. I would recommend trying to speak with your neighbor about the situation and letting her know that there are things that can be done so that the existing cat population doesn't continue to grow. And maybe you should try to even lend her a hand if she is on board. Taking care of these situations should be done as a community and not seen as one individual's problem. TNRing the cats will make it better for her, better for you, and better for the cats.

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