behold the power of red paint - Brooklynian

behold the power of red paint

Washington and Lincoln



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Comments

  • Oh, I love these old city boxes. The new paint job looks great.

  • The boxes should be painted once every 40 years, whether they need it or not.

  • I've always walked by them and wondered if they still work. Do they just connect straight to 911?

  • everyone has cell phones these days, even the poorest people, since cell phones even work when there is no services attach to it. old cell phones are use for 911 etc...

    I wonder how much those cost the city to maintain?

  • AW- According to second article I quote below, about $9M.

    tjaded- This first article is for you.

    wiki wrote: In December of 1994, then-Mayor Rudolph Giuliani and then-Fire Commissioner Howard Safir began a concerted effort to remove all of the mechanical and E.R.S. boxes throughout New York City in a cost-cutting move. Facing stiff opposition from members of the City Council, community groups, dispatchers and others, the move was blocked by court order as being discriminatory against the disabled [i.e., particularly the speech- and/or hearing-impaired] who — along with the poor — might otherwise have no dependable way to report fires and emergencies if the alarm boxes were eliminated. (In addition, unlike many other cities in the world, it was noted that 117 different languages and dialects are spoken by the residents of and visitors to the "Big Apple." Since, unlike telephones, a fire alarm box requires no verbal contact to indicate its exact location, a person would not have to be able to speak — at all — or to understand English in order to alert the F.D.N.Y. to a fire or emergency. For this reason, as well, the boxes were recognized as being vital to New Yorkers' safety.). In December of 1994, then-Mayor Rudolph Giuliani and then-Fire Commissioner Howard Safir began a concerted effort to remove all of the mechanical and E.R.S. boxes throughout New York City in a cost-cutting move. Facing stiff opposition from members of the City Council, community groups, dispatchers and others, the move was blocked by court order as being discriminatory against the disabled [i.e., particularly the speech- and/or hearing-impaired] who — along with the poor — might otherwise have no dependable way to report fires and emergencies if the alarm boxes were eliminated. (In addition, unlike many other cities in the world, it was noted that 117 different languages and dialects are spoken by the residents of and visitors to the "Big Apple." Since, unlike telephones, a fire alarm box requires no verbal contact to indicate its exact location, a person would not have to be able to speak — at all — or to understand English in order to alert the F.D.N.Y. to a fire or emergency. For this reason, as well, the boxes were recognized as being vital to New Yorkers' safety.)

    Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_York_City_Fire_Department

    More recently, in 2010:

    vosizneias wrote: New York - New York City officials have asked a federal court for permission to abandon an old-fashioned alarm system that predates the days when people dialed 911 from their cell phones to summon help.The city now spends $9 million per year maintaining a network of 15,000 emergency street boxes. They allow people to alert emergency dispatchers by pushing a button or pulling a lever.Use of the boxes has dropped by 90 percent in the past 15 years, and false alarms outnumber true emergencies 9 to 1.But a court blocked the city from getting rid of the boxes in 1996 because of the potential impact on deaf residents.Advocates say that for people who are hearing-impaired, the alarm boxes are still valuable.The city’s request isn’t expected to be decided for several months.

    source: http://www.vosizneias.com/58801/2010/06/26/new-york-nyc-wants-to-remove-emergency-alarm-boxes/

    I assume the city was not able to remove the boxes despite going to court in 2010, and the things are still maintained in working order. I can't say I have ever seen one used, much less had to use one.

    I just think old ornate cast iron ones look cool.

  • asshole childhood friends have ring up cops and fire etc.. on those things and ran they works trust me.

  • I think they're useful for storing toothbrush and toothpaste.

  • The boxes are here to stay!

    A federal judge in Manhattan has refused to allow the Bloomberg administration to eliminate 15,000 emergency-help boxes from New York’s streets, saying the city’s proposed alternative involving public pay phones is not adequate because it would discriminate against the deaf and hearing-impaired.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2011/08/16/nyregion/city-is-ordered-to-keep-emergency-help-boxes.html

  • Sweet.

    There is an intact one on Classon that I have my eye on.

This discussion has been closed.