Why does everyone hate Park Slope? - Brooklynian
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  • I know I know.. I read it too....

    Don't hate da playa, hate da game
  • I predict good things to come of this thread.
  • Don't hate da playa, hate da game
    if you're not part of the solution, you're part of the problem.
  • epiphanyproudfoot wrote: Don't hate da playa, hate da game
    if you're not part of the solution, you're part of the problem.

    What are you talking about? What is your solution to people complaining about babies and hipsters? Have a sense of humor. I'm not a breeder, not rich, not a homeowner, not hip. The article is like watching Access Hollywood, it's inconsequential gossip. Every town/nabe has a problem with something. Do you live in PS, BTW?
  • yes, i do live in park slope. and i don't think the problem is people complaining about it. i think the problem is people not taking responsibility for their actions, not being held accountable, and lack of tolerance, and self-awareness, not to mention a stupid sense of entitlement. i'm saying that the problem is societal and the solution lies within the individual.
  • I still love the potential of Park Slope - everything is cyclical and even the stroller mafia will one day pass.

    But the hipster must die!
  • Because everyone needs to hate something. It's human nature. It makes people feel better about themselves.

    And now that it's no longer okay to openly hate blacks, Muslims, women, gays, lesbians, fat people, poor people, Jews, Communists, etc, etc, there's only one group it's safe to proudly hate: sincere liberal upper-middle-class white people.

    They're especially fun to hate because unlike other groups, the more you hate and punish them, the more they hang their heads, bite their quivering lower lip and ask what they've done to make you hate them, and how they can pacify you by being better people. So you actually get rewarded for hating liberal upper-middle-class white people! (And their kids too!)

    It's just the icing on the cake that most Slopers take themselves and their politics and their commitment to social justice so very seriously. People taking themselves really seriously is always comedy gold.

    So, to sum it up:

    No danger of being called a bigot + no lawsuits or retaliations + predictable laffs = great value for haters!
  • Great comment Brooke Lynn! I agree the article is idiotic.

    ATTENTION people who hate Park Slope: Please move out so I can afford to buy something.

    Anyone? Hello? (cue cricket noises)
  • "Brooke Lynn Knight" wrote: And now that it's no longer okay to openly hate blacks, Muslims, women, gays, lesbians, fat people, poor people, Jews, Communists, etc, etc, there's only one group it's safe to proudly hate: sincere liberal upper-middle-class white people.
    Maybe. But the earnestness, money and angst lavished on the typical park slope child is silly. It is excessive and seems antithetical to the supposed liberal, save the world reputation that the slope once had. This new wave of parents are too busy buying bugaboos to send extra cash to Doctors without Borders. God Forbid little Fiona feels a bump on the sidewalk. What the potential of the slope was and the reality of what the slope is now becoming are in conflict

    What does "K-mom's scary secret anonymous stalker" mean anyway?
  • WTGirl - do you have any source of information for how much $$ people in Park Slope donate to charitable organizations?
  • i think you all like to make generalizations about park slope moms in particular that really pertains to a small minority of those people. i encounter pleasant, down to earth, friendly and yes wealthy park slope moms all the time. just because someone buys a particular brand of stroller does not make a person a certain way. that way of thinking is even more juvenile that most of those being pushed around in said strollers.

    open your eyes and realize that the existence of all of these parents and children in our midst is as someone said, perhaps cyclical but also a very good and healthy sign for our neighborhood to have become an enclave in the largest metropolitan urban city in america that people have chosen to live here instead of migrating to the suburbs.

    this city is made up of many different quotients that play off each other and as much fun as you think park slope would be with no parents, it simply isn't healthy for the city or society in general.

    i, for one will continue to take pride in my neighborhood...all of its residents rather than hating on a certain group because you don't get asked how your day was by every passing park slope mom.

    as for the borders, tea lounge, starbucks, etc....

    good...more people should ban these places from their repertoire so we can get some more of the businesses back that made park slope unique in the first place.

    ever heard of a place called ozzie's? you all should try it sometime. not only is the coffee better, but the people there recognize you, it's a far more appealing space and it's a business unique to park slope.
  • WTGirl wrote:
    What does "K-mom's scary secret anonymous stalker" mean anyway?
    I'd tell you, but...

    ...it's a secret!

    (and scary!)
  • "willregistersoon" wrote: WTGirl - do you have any source of information for how much $$ people in Park Slope donate to charitable organizations?
    I could look it up. But statistically African Americans give a higher percentage of their income to charity, rural Americans give a higher percentage of their income to charity, people on the west coast give a higher percentage of their income to charity then those on the East and finally according to the Wall Street Journal--the rich don't give as much to charity as the less well-off.

    So using some deductive reasoning I assumed park Sloperes were giving less then they used to since there are less African Americans, more rich people and it is still located on the east coast.
  • WTGirl wrote: [quote=willregistersoon]WTGirl - do you have any source of information for how much $$ people in Park Slope donate to charitable organizations?
    I could look it up. But statistically African Americans give a higher percentage of their income to charity, rural Americans give a higher percentage of their income to charity, people on the west coast give a higher percentage of their income to charity then those on the East and finally according to the Wall Street Journal--the rich don't give as much to charity as the less well-off.

    So using some deductive reasoning I assumed park Sloperes were giving less then they used to since there are less African Americans, more rich people and it is still located on the east coast.
    I'd bet that basically all of those figures are skewed by donations to churches.
  • I like park slope, but what I want to know is, has anyone found my boy's lost hat?
  • WTGirl wrote: [quote=willregistersoon]WTGirl - do you have any source of information for how much $$ people in Park Slope donate to charitable organizations?
    I could look it up. But statistically African Americans give a higher percentage of their income to charity, rural Americans give a higher percentage of their income to charity, people on the west coast give a higher percentage of their income to charity then those on the East and finally according to the Wall Street Journal--the rich don't give as much to charity as the less well-off.

    So using some deductive reasoning I assumed park Sloperes were giving less then they used to since there are less African Americans, more rich people and it is still located on the east coast.

    This response doesn't address the original question.

    WTGirl took the % of income cop out rather than adressing whole dollars donated question as posed by WRS....

    A larger % of smaller numbers doesn't necessarily add up to big $$.
  • kosherdave wrote: I like park slope, but what I want to know is, has anyone found my boy's lost hat?
    Fantastic!
  • because someone buys a particular brand of stroller does not make a person a certain way
    Belzjm: I don't think folks are complaining over the brand of stroller, at least I'm not. We live in NYC so anything that blocks the entire sidewalk and prevents me from walking down the street drives me insane. They should all move to NJ or LI!
    They're especially fun to hate because unlike other groups, the more you hate and punish them, the more they hang their heads, bite their quivering lower lip and ask what they've done to make you hate them, and how they can pacify you by being better people. So you actually get rewarded for hating liberal upper-middle-class white people! (And their kids too!)
    What in the world is this about? Not sure how we got here but the only connection to race that I see on this topic is liberal upper-middle class white people have more sense of entitlement and so they don't care about the rest of us who are trying to spend a quite afternoon at the bookstore. I can't tolerate them for that reason alone, not because I'm trying to tap into some wierd white guilt. Besides that's played out, most white folks are not buying the guilt trip anymore.
  • WTGirl wrote: Maybe. But the earnestness, money and angst lavished on the typical park slope child is silly. It is excessive and seems antithetical to the supposed liberal, save the world reputation that the slope once had. This new wave of parents are too busy buying bugaboos to send extra cash to Doctors without Borders. God Forbid little Fiona feels a bump on the sidewalk. What the potential of the slope was and the reality of what the slope is now becoming are in conflict.
    Ya, maybe. But that (liberal lip service, spoiled kids, and paticularly the "sense of entitlement" so often and lovingly mentioned in these threads) could describe a lot of places in New York City.

    No, I blame the Co-op.
  • Drano wrote: Ya, maybe. But that (liberal lip service, spoiled kids, and paticularly the "sense of entitlement" so often and lovingly mentioned in these threads) could describe a lot of places in New York City.
    It could be used to describe a lot of places in this country and world - why do the haters think that this is particular to BK and specifically PS? Am I the only one that's caught an episode or two of those nanny rescue shows?
  • The weird thing about hate is that it makes people obsess more and more about whatever it is that they hate--so much so that they end up mirroring a lot of the things they revile so much. Its true. I've seen it with me own two eyes.
  • Drano wrote:
    Ya, maybe. But that (liberal lip service, spoiled kids, and paticularly the "sense of entitlement" so often and lovingly mentioned in these threads) could describe a lot of places in New York City.

    Yeah, hang out in Tribeca sometime.

    I agree with belzjm that children (and parents of young children) are the last group that it's acceptable to hate.

    Park Slope seems to have more than its share of sanctimonious and humorless people. Some of them are parents and some of them are all outraged about strollers.
  • Rose wrote: Yeah, hang out in Tribeca sometime.
    Well, that's in Manhattan, so it's ok - encouraged, even. And then those same people can turn around and toss off a few snide comments about Park Slope in order to convince themselves that they aren't self-indulgent assnuggets.

    Cool!
  • Rose wrote:
    I agree with belzjm that children (and parents of young children) are the last group that it's acceptable to hate.

    well, let's not forget people from the midwest -- at least based on comments on this board.

    [i'm not from the midwest. but where i'm from gets plenty of flak, too.]
  • What is the problem with Park Slope again? It's too nice? Too safe? Too many people think it's the perfect place to start a family? The brownstones look too well-maintained? The park is too green, too big? The food is too plentiful and varied? Too many varieties of flowers are sold on the corner? The canopy of trees provides too much shade? It's too pretty? People don't feel the need to spend 20 minutes in their closet before they pick up their groceries? Walking is too pleasant? There are too many dogs? Too many kids laughing and having fun? Not enough make-up? The real estate keeps increasing in value? Residents care too much about their neighborhood?

    I love to hate on things as much as the next person, but I love Park Slope. Hate on it all you want, but it's the loveliest, nicest, most comfortable place I have ever been lucky enough to live.

    I hope caaahyoko is right, and other neighborhoods start to mirror Park Slope. Because, as a public school teacher, I'm sure I'll get priced out of here soon, and I hope the next place I live has all the same characteristics. (minus starbucks, and add a few basketballcourts, and maybe a view of the ocean, and....)
  • The people that hate Park Slope are resentful that they are not here.

    I moved here in the 70's, it was not clean, safe or gentrified. The people who complan
    that it is too nice, safe, beautiful etc. are the same people
    who wouldn't visit me because they were afraid to leave the comfort of
    suburbia.

    Park Slope is great because the people who moved here when it was
    edgey worked hard to make it reflect how they wanted to live.

    Windowdresssing says it all, what are they complaining about?

    Why do people assume that crime, graffiti, boom boxes and thugs
    are a authentic NYC experience? If the poseurs want to live in an unsafe
    and gritty nabe to feel authentic, move elsewhere, but don't badmouth
    the Slope.
  • everytime someone comes out from manhattan to visit me in park slope, they fall in love. they are in shock about how lovely, vibrant and beautiful it is. most, if not all have contemplated a move to park slope. i agree with the above that people hate park slope only out of pure jealousy. all in all, there really isn't much to hate. the beauty of park slope is that from ppw down to 4th avenue, we really do have something for nearly everyone.
  • People who hate PS don't necessarily wish they lived there, but there's definitely a current of resentment in the mix. Resentment at the affluence, the illusion of blissful middle-class happiness with 2.3 smiling kids and a dog, etc. I'm one of the bitter types who hates kids and all that wholesome crap too--having to dodge strollers makes my stomach turn. That being said, I wouldn't claim that they are objectively "bad"--it's just my personal taste, like not liking the cold weather. I'm not openly hostile to young families, I just choose to live where they don't congregate en masse.

    As far as people who it's safe to hate, not to worry--there are still tons of them out there. Let's think: it's definitely still okay to hate WASPs from Connecticut or the Hamptons who wear pink shirts and pleated khakis, frat boys, investment bankers, corporate lawyers, real estate agents, any kind of salesperson, rich people in general, chauvinists, hipsters, yuppies, gentrifiers, neighborhood newcomers, CEOs, executives of oil/pharmaceutical/financial companies, paparazzi, media barons, hedge fund managers, trust fund babies...and the list goes on. So breathe easy, haters, you still have plenty of viable targets out there.
  • I agree with belzjm. When my friends visited this past week, they fell in love with PS and Brooklyn in general. I like my neighborhood and all the surrounding nabes. I still get my hate on every now and then, but over all I'm a happy camper.
    As far as the article goes, it's a dumb one sided page-filler. Low quality journalism, I'd rather read the boards.
  • "escap" wrote: Let's think: it's definitely still okay to hate WASPs from Connecticut or the Hamptons who wear pink shirts and pleated khakis, frat boys, investment bankers, corporate lawyers, real estate agents, any kind of salesperson, rich people in general, chauvinists, hipsters, yuppies, gentrifiers, neighborhood newcomers, CEOs, executives of oil/pharmaceutical/financial companies, paparazzi, media barons, hedge fund managers, trust fund babies...and the list goes on. So breathe easy, haters, you still have plenty of viable targets out there.
    But isn't your list the "new" Park Slope resident?

    I don't hate the slope by the way, just would rather not live there. (Happy to eat on 5th Avenue though and then come home).
  • belzjm wrote: everytime someone comes out from manhattan to visit me in park slope, they fall in love. they are in shock about how lovely, vibrant and beautiful it is. most, if not all have contemplated a move to park slope.
    That was me in 1989 or so, just out of college, living in White Plains, which was boring, and working in midtown Manhattan, which seemed so overwhelming and chaotic after four years of living in the sticks. I came to PS one day to visit a friend and I was in love. It certainly has its faults, but there is nowhere else in NYC I'd rather live.
  • WTGirl wrote: [quote=escap]Let's think: it's definitely still okay to hate WASPs from Connecticut or the Hamptons who wear pink shirts and pleated khakis, frat boys, investment bankers, corporate lawyers, real estate agents, any kind of salesperson, rich people in general, chauvinists, hipsters, yuppies, gentrifiers, neighborhood newcomers, CEOs, executives of oil/pharmaceutical/financial companies, paparazzi, media barons, hedge fund managers, trust fund babies...and the list goes on. So breathe easy, haters, you still have plenty of viable targets out there.
    But isn't your list the "new" Park Slope resident?

    I don't hate the slope by the way, just would rather not live there. (Happy to eat on 5th Avenue though and then come home).

    You think? I don't know, I see Park Slopers as more of the bland, liberal, latte-drinking do-gooders who protest against the Atlantic Yards in their spare time and revile such things as George Bush, pharma and energy companies, not to mention frat boys etc. I could definitely be wrong, having long ago fallen out of the loop over there, but my recent trips over to 5th and 7th aves could definitely not be mistaken for strolls through South Hampton or Greenwich. At least, I hope not for the sake of the neighborhood.
  • You know, I read about the Park Slope hating all the time, both in the media and on this board... but I have to agree with some others and say I don't really get it. I love living in Park Slope. I've lived in NYC for 10 years, and this is by far my favorite place I've lived, Manhattan or otherwise. Everyone who comes to visit me loves it. From out-of-towners to Manhattanites (although they can be begrudging about it... but I just think they need to convince themselves it's worth paying that much in rent.)

    I'm not a parent, I'm certainly not rich, I don't believe I'm a hipster (although I'd like to believe I'm sometimes "hip")... and I've honestly never encountered much of the stuff I read about as the main problems with the slope. Then again, I don't spend nearly as much time on 7th Ave, much more on 5th, so maybe I just miss a lot of it? :P
  • Rose wrote: [quote=belzjm]everytime someone comes out from manhattan to visit me in park slope, they fall in love. they are in shock about how lovely, vibrant and beautiful it is. most, if not all have contemplated a move to park slope.
    That was me in 1989 or so, just out of college, living in White Plains, which was boring, and working in midtown Manhattan, which seemed so overwhelming and chaotic after four years of living in the sticks. I came to PS one day to visit a friend and I was in love. It certainly has its faults, but there is nowhere else in NYC I'd rather live.

    It's pretty sweet that this thread needs a name change to "Why Do People Love The Slope?"
    ha!
    Totally agree with Mamita that the article is unimaginative filler, or rather a retread on the bandwagon.

    I thought the New Hate was shaping up like the way people were/are free to hate the Upper East Side, for it's $$$ - hating on the bugaboos and investment banker parents,
    instead of the Old Hate which was hating on the crunchy: public interest lawyers, writers, social workers, multiracial queer couples, divine greenspace, great food lalala


    :D
  • The New Hate really is The Hipster - I'm not kidding - I mean who can stand those skinny jean wearing, pork pie hatted, converse tripping self-indulgent dicks? They must be killed off and soon or PS and especially PH will never be the same.
    http://www.timeout.com/newyork/Details.do?page=1&xyurl=xyl://TONYWebArticles1/609/features/why_the_hipster_must_die.xml
  • but most of the articles about "hating" park slope have to do with hipsters... and they live in bburg. trust me, i work there. ain't no hipsters here in PS, that's why i like it here.
  • That article, and all its related articles could be lauded as some of the Hackiest writing to Be Hacked out by King Hack of Hacklyvania.

    My initial response to it can be summarized by this bit of dialogue from, of all the least hipster things in the world, an Adam Sandler movie:

    "[this article] is one of the most insanely idiotic things I have ever heard. At no point in your rambling, incoherent response were you even close to anything that could be considered a rational thought. Everyone in this room is now dumber for having listened to it. I award you no points, and may God have mercy on your soul."

    Really now, people. Hipster hating is like swatting flies with a Chevy.
  • As a now-guilty, self-loathing Park Slope parent of a 4 month old and stroller user (I sometimes do carry my child), I apologize for the self indulgance, pushiness, sidewalk rudeness of myself, my yuppie wife and my yuppie co-conspirators in the "stroller mafia." I know we've caused our neighbors so much angst over the years - clogging the sidewalks, taking up extra space at the Tea Lounge, interrupting your late afternoon beer drinking at The Gate, and subjecting parent bulletin board readers to (aghast) discussions about parenting.

    Our family will get out of your hair, pack our SUV (oh wait, I have a '92 Honda Accord) and move to Montclaire, NJ -- the suburbs, where we can find a really big house with a really big garage and a nice suburban school. I'll be sure to increase my charitable donations to the synogogue I join (those rascally non-religious charities we now support just aren't bring me enough spiritual enlightenment).

    We know that the sense of community that has flourished in Park Slope in recent years - increased participation in the Civic Council, booming farmers market, vibrant park attendance -- will only get better when attractive, single 20-somethings fill the vaccum left by the self indulgent parents who couldn't be bothered.

    So lame!!!
  • Ben, I moved to Montclair when my kids were little. I couldn't wait to move back to Park Slope.
  • When I moved here (early 90s) it seemed like Park Slope for a lot of young families was a stop between the Upper West Side and Montclair or Hastings-on-Hudson. People moved here after they had a baby and then moved on when the kid was old enough for kindergarten. But now it seems like most of the young families just stay, if they can afford it, rather than moving to the burbs.
  • lmboogie wrote:
    Belzjm: I don't think folks are complaining over the brand of stroller, at least I'm not. We live in NYC so anything that blocks the entire sidewalk and prevents me from walking down the street drives me insane. They should all move to NJ or LI!
    I guess the question that comes to mind is why is it that you (and so many ohers apparently) are driven so 'insane' by strollers that you want all these parents to move to NJ or LI but you have no issue with groups of people taking out a card table and paying cards on the same sidewalk?????
    I will remind you of your May 16, 2007 quote:
    lmboogie wrote: why would you have an issue with folks playing cards on the sidewalk?
    Clearly such divergent hostilities towards different types of 'sidewalk blocking' indicates that your (and many others) anger does not come from the act of blocking the sidewalk or the sense of 'entitlement' demonstrated by the "sidewalk blocker" but rather WHO the sidewalk blocker is.
  • thanks pitbull. i'm glad you said it. i was thinking the same thing.

    i think people who complain about strollers like to do so because they have nothing else better to complain about.

    or they are the type that will complain about nearly everything under the sun.

    we also have to keep in mind that we have a lot of bitter single people out there (i've had my moments too) that see no end in sight to their singledom and like to hate on those that have coupled up and had kids. it's a new york pheonomenon that i wish would subside. embrace being single. don't hate those who aren't.

    either way, i'm happy to walk in the street if there's a gaggle of kids, moms, card players, lezzies, old folks, teeny boppers or whoever else might be there if they aren't walking up to my pace.

    don't hate em, though.

    hey...at least we are the only place around that i can think of that still has the lovely bluestone or flagstone sidewalks in many of those narrow spots up on 7th near flatbush.
  • belzjm wrote:
    we also have to keep in mind that we have a lot of bitter single people out there (i've had my moments too) that see no end in sight to their singledom and like to hate on those that have coupled up and had kids. it's a new york pheonomenon that i wish would subside. embrace being single. don't hate those who aren't.

    Why are you assuming being single makes someone bitter? Why would you assume single, or coupled people for that matter, inherently desire children. Are you implying that the goal to one's life is marriage and children? If you don't have this you're bitter?

    Not trying to start an argument, but that's the impression I got from your post. :? and personally I don't have the slightest urge to procreate and I'm not bitter. If people are hating on strollers and kids, it's because some people don't like to be bothered by anyone or anything sometimes. Not because they're jealous.
  • Here's a thought, apropos of the last few posts.

    Personally, I hate the welfare moms and their sense of entitlement -- the way they clog up the streets with their strollers and screaming brats. Jesus, lady, get your ugly snot-nosed urchins out of my way! And move somewhere else -- I'm sick of people like you ruining my nice neighborhood!

    Personally, I hate the Park Slope moms and their sense of entitlement -- the way they clog up the streets with their strollers and screaming brats. Jesus, lady, get your ugly snot-nosed urchins out of my way! And move somewhere else -- I'm sick of people like you ruining my nice neighborhood!

    Does only one of the previous paragraphs offend you? If so, why?
  • I guess the question that comes to mind is why is it that you (and so many ohers apparently) are driven so 'insane' by strollers that you want all these parents to move to NJ or LI but you have no issue with groups of people taking out a card table and paying cards on the same sidewalk
    I've been expecting this and actually thought someone would catch it a lot sooner. The NJ/LI comment was really my sad attempt at being over the top. Sorry it came off as a serious request for a mass migration to the burbs.

    I'm bored with the card playing degenerates post so I don't even want to go back to read but if memory serves me. They were not blocking the entire sidewalk. Besides I've since played cards with one of those fellows (even shared a 40) they really are not as bad as you think.
  • Does only one of the previous paragraphs offend you? If so, why?
    Really not offended by either of your comments but maybe if I were a welfare mother and or a park slope mom, I would be.

    Look, I'm offended by anyone who is not present, aware and considerate of what is going on around them.

    All I"m saying is if you live in a small neighborhood with small sidewalks that is overpopulated then think twice before buying a damn stroller that takes up the entire sidewalk.

    Believe me... this isn't about moms (welfare or not) or strollers. I have the same opinion about folks who buy Hummers or SUVs. EXCESSIVE is all I"m saying.
  • i actually think you've pretty much nailed it... i moved here from the suburbs, a place very much like montclair, with strollers just as big et alia. the fact is, out there there's a whole lotta room for bigger things. like strollers or hummers or attitudes.

    you couldn't pay me enough to go back.
  • we also have to keep in mind that we have a lot of bitter single people out there (i've had my moments too) that see no end in sight to their singledom and like to hate on those that have coupled up and had kids
    I wasn't going to touch this one but I think you may really believe what you wrote. Nevermind, just saw Mamacita's post and have similar questions and comments.
  • belzjm wrote:

    we also have to keep in mind that we have a lot of bitter single people out there (i've had my moments too) that see no end in sight to their singledom and like to hate on those that have coupled up and had kids. it's a new york pheonomenon that i wish would subside. embrace being single. don't hate those who aren't.
    nauseating.

    being single isn't what makes me angry, it's people who THINK single people are bitter who piss me off.
  • I've lived in the Slope for 15 years. I've really loved it but now I'm starting to hate it because it's become so fashionable that I'm getting priced out ... the company that took over my building is now charging $2000 for 500 sq ft apartments with no closets. :roll: The real estate greed around here is leaving a bad taste in my mouth.
  • Mamacita wrote: [quote=belzjm]we also have to keep in mind that we have a lot of bitter single people out there (i've had my moments too) that see no end in sight to their singledom and like to hate on those that have coupled up and had kids. it's a new york pheonomenon that i wish would subside. embrace being single. don't hate those who aren't.
    Why are you assuming being single makes someone bitter? Why would you assume single, or coupled people for that matter, inherently desire children. Are you implying that the goal to one's life is marriage and children? If you don't have this you're bitter?

    Not trying to start an argument, but that's the impression I got from your post. :? and personally I don't have the slightest urge to procreate and I'm not bitter.
    AMEN.
  • the company that took over my building is now charging $2000 for 500 sq ft apartments with no closets. The real estate greed around here is leaving a bad taste in my mouth.
    I'm part of the problem. I just moved here from Tribeca so $2000 for 500 sqf is a steal. Rents in the city have more than doubled so hang tight cuz I don't think things will get any better in PS.
  • lmboogie wrote: the company that took over my building is now charging $2000 for 500 sq ft apartments with no closets. The real estate greed around here is leaving a bad taste in my mouth.
    I'm part of the problem. I just moved here from Tribeca so $2000 for 500 sqf is a steal. Rents in the city have more than doubled so hang tight cuz I don't think things will get any better in PS.
    Unfortunately I can't hang tight, I have to move. It sucks.

    What were you paying in Tribeca?
  • Really sorry you have to move. It certainly SUCKS.

    I was paying $3600 for a one bedroom. Now paying $2200 for a small bedroom with a garden.
  • lmboogie wrote: I was paying $3600 for a one bedroom.
    Jeezus Mary and Joseph! On a bicycle! :shock: :shock: :shock:

    Obviously other people have much better-paying jobs than I do ...
  • we also have to keep in mind that we have a lot of bitter single people out there (i've had my moments too) that see no end in sight to their singledom and like to hate on those that have coupled up and had kids. it's a new york pheonomenon that i wish would subside. embrace being single. don't hate those who aren't.
    Sorry...just can't let this one go. I have been in a loving relationship for over 8 years. No I have no interest in having children but that's my choice and probably the best decision I've made my entire life. You're comment is so absurd that it actually made me hope you don't have any daughters. Really bad message to be sending to any gilr/woman.
  • "lmboogie" wrote: Really sorry you have to move. It certainly SUCKS.

    I was paying $3600 for a one bedroom. Now paying $2200 for a small bedroom with a garden.
    Landlords know there are lots of you waiting to rent out apartments in the slope and slowly and surely the teachers and social workers and other people not in the big money making game who have built the mythical? community in the slope are leaving. That is why I don't love the slope--because it isn't the neighborhood it was even 10 years ago. It isn't the strollers or the entitlement but it is because it is becoming less and less diverse and more and more the upper east side (I even saw a woman wearing a maid's uniform last month!). It is truly a beautiful neighborhood and it is a convenient neighborhood but to me, it is not really an interesting neighborhood (IMO). I think the bitterness people may feel is that their homes are being taken away? Not sure since I think there are lots of great neighborhoods in Brooklyn.
  • how do we know the maid's uniform wasn't for some other sexier purpose?
  • brooklynpotter wrote: how do we know the maid's uniform wasn't for some other sexier purpose?
    French maid outfit = teh sex

    Actual Real Life Maid Outfit = no sexay

    :wink:
  • WTGirl wrote: Landlords know there are lots of you waiting to rent out apartments in the slope and slowly and surely the teachers and social workers and other people not in the big money making game who have built the mythical? community in the slope are leaving.
    Yeah, silly me, working as a book indexer. Not much money in that.
    WTGirl wrote: to me, it is not really an interesting neighborhood (IMO). I think the bitterness people may feel is that their homes are being taken away?
    I moved to 3rd Street in 1992 but the mid/north Slope seems a bit sterile and uninteresting to me now (I now live on 13th). I thought I would live in PS forever and ever, but I think I may be souring on the relationship. Sigh.
  • I think the bitterness people may feel is that their homes are being taken away?
    And a damn good reason to feel bitter. In 1987 after living on 13St & 8th Ave for over 15 years we were evicted so people like me (now) can come live here. We were dirt poor and had no where to go but the projects so I can relate to feeling bitter. By the Grace of God, I was able to do better and now instead of bitter I kinda feel guilt for coming back and contributing to Rose having to move out of her apt.
  • Subject: Why do people love the Slope?

    pitu wrote: [quote=Rose][quote=belzjm]everytime someone comes out from manhattan to visit me in park slope, they fall in love. they are in shock about how lovely, vibrant and beautiful it is. most, if not all have contemplated a move to park slope.
    That was me in 1989 or so, just out of college, living in White Plains, which was boring, and working in midtown Manhattan, which seemed so overwhelming and chaotic after four years of living in the sticks. I came to PS one day to visit a friend and I was in love. It certainly has its faults, but there is nowhere else in NYC I'd rather live.

    It's pretty sweet that this thread needs a name change to "Why Do People Love The Slope?"
    ha!
    Totally agree with Mamita that the article is unimaginative filler, or rather a retread on the bandwagon.

    I thought the New Hate was shaping up like the way people were/are free to hate the Upper East Side, for it's $$$ - hating on the bugaboos and investment banker parents,
    instead of the Old Hate which was hating on the crunchy: public interest lawyers, writers, social workers, multiracial queer couples, divine greenspace, great food lalala


    :D
  • I Love the Slope because it isn't New Jersey. Also, the rents in the South Slope/Greenwood Heights (wherever the heck I am) is much cheaper than PS "proper".
  • ok, fine. you aren't bitter. i'm not either. i've already said above that i don't mind park slope moms at all. i think it's ridiculous to say such a thing. i guess i was trying to make a guess why some people have it in their heads that it's only park slope moms that take up space, etc. my point was that i encounter people every day taking up the sidewalk...probably just as much as park slope moms. how about tourists? let's hate them more. they take up more room and walk more slowly. see my point?

    as someone said, it's the complete disregard for other people that's annoying. since people seem so eager to hate only park slope moms for this when talking about our neighborhood, i figured i'd take a guess why some people might be so stereotypical. apparently there are many non biiter single and non single people on this board. i'm glad. i myself am happy to be single at this moment also. no kids, yet i seem to coexist in the midst of 7th avenue quite fine.
  • wait...guys, come on. this is exactly the kind of circular, pointless conversation that PS is mocked for, and perhaps with some justice. if what the article says is biased, so be it. we all live here. if we like it, we stay. if not, we leave. certainly no one paying the rent here is being forced to stay because they can't afford to move somewhere hipper (or less hip, depending on whether you hate hipsters for being here or hate articles for incorrectly saying they're here), grungier, or more graffiti-covered.

    and yes, if don't like children, certain aspects of the neighborhood at this time might be considered annoying. but at the same time, we know from a zillion studies that children raised in stable, middle class homes, surrounded by doting adults who talk to them and expose them to lots of different experiences are more likely to succeed in school and in life than children who come from less. let's not despise parents who are doing what they can to do a good job, nor their children for being privileged.

    by the way, you can't ungeneralize from a study on the "east coast" and assume that typical east coast charitable = typical park slope charitable giving, or even typical new york state giving. the east coast also includes lots of fiscally conservative states with rich people who don't like giving money.
  • lnelson, i think that think thread has turned into two... the problems people have with PS, and the person who thinks single child-free woman are bitter. i've has so many discussions about the former i can't even go there on this board without getting my head ripped off.

    as for the latter, it's so insulting to read that many strong, independent women from many neighborhoods in many states would be pissed off by it.
  • Subject: Park Slope is the closest neighborhood to Sesame Street

    Park Slope is disliked by some people because it is one of a hand full of neighborhoods in the city that most represent what everyone else would like their neighborhoods to be; a decent place with an active community, a park, and a sense of purpose. It is just simple jealousy of the hard work and the dedication of many people that has made this Brooklyn neighborhood strong and interesting over the years.

    When someone states Park Slope is not the "real" Brooklyn, it's only because they don't know what the "real" Brooklyn looks like in the first place. Pathetic criticism of pregnant or child-bearing women is just a misunderstanding of the general point. Children and mothers have always been in this neighborhood, and they are essential. Don't be a mother hater.

    If anyone would like to get psychological with this analysis, the dislike really comes from Park Slope's close resemblance to PBS's Sesame Street. Who wouldn't be pissed not to live here?

    image

    And of course, who cares what these people think anyway. The greatest part of being in Park Slope is that it doesn't really matter what other people think. Were in Brooklyn now.

    Charlesbklyn
  • Subject: Re: Park Slope is the closest neighborhood to Sesame Street

    charlesbklyn wrote: When someone states Park Slope is not the "real" Brooklyn, it's only because they don't know what the "real" Brooklyn looks like in the first place.
    Right. All those of us who were here before the yuppie train rolled in from Pennsatucky were just placeholders for you, waiting for the 'real Brooklynites' to come and take over. :roll: :roll: :roll:

    Park Slope hating must be one of those cases where 'everyone else is crazy', huh.:wink:
  • Oh, this is my favorite part! When people pull out the "if you disagree with me, you must be from Iowa/"Pennsatuckey"/Ohio" card. It's always accompanied by a claim to be the only one who knows what the "real" Brooklyn is. This thread is just getting good! OK, all you "real" people -- I'll grab some popcorn while you tell us who is "real" enough to live here and who has no right to take up sidewalk space. Be sure to throw in a lecture about "diversity" as you explain that only certain people should be allowed to go into certain neighborhoods.

    Actually, strollers are a huge pain in the butt to use, but if I know I'm giving some rigid stick-up-his-ass "hipster" a coronary, it'll make using them quite enjoyable. Thanks! I only have one kid, but maybe I'll buy a twin stroller, just for fun. I'll choose one with a sharp steel protuberance right at Achilles-tendon height. See ya round!
  • how about tourists? let's hate them more. they take up more room and walk more slowly. see my point?
    At this point, I realize it's silly to continue respondind to this but darn it.. it's so hard not to.

    I"m not understanding what you guys mean by "hate" which is a word I don't regulary use but I'm probably missing something. I don't hate anyone but I do find some people more annoying than others.

    Toursist are high on my list of people who annoy me. Not because they are tourist but because in most cases they are walking around looking up, completely unaware, see my point? I work near Times Square, it's a nightmare getting to the train after working 13 hours. I lived in London for a few years and would go on holiday Spain, English tourists annoyed me. Not because they were English or tourists but because they were unaware and felt "entitled" to the best holiday they could have with no consideration for the rest.

    I'm not sure where you got the impression I was singling out PS Moms so I think me trying to explain is just a waste of time because you are going to continue believing it..

    If you're going to refernece my comments on the degenerates on 5th ave. then I'll say it one last time.... based on what I read... they were not blocking the entire sidewalk and it seemed the person posting the original thread was just annoyed at the mere sight of them having a beer and playing cards outside of where they live.

    In the end, I think we both agree....
    it's the complete disregard for other people that's annoying
  • There are rude people everywhere. I can't remember being attacked by a toddler or having my path blocked by a stroller, but my own pet peeve is the people who are so engrossed in their cell phone conversations that they are totally oblivious to their surroundings.

    On the diversity/"real people" issue, my South Slope block has a mix of Italian families who have been here for generations, food co-op members who breast-feed their toddlers, lawyers, single hipsters, lesbians, members of several different races/nationalities, etc. We have a fashion magazine editor and people who breed pit bulls in their backyard. Everyone seems to get along nicely.
  • I can't really believe that people actually expend any karmic or psychic energy hating PS moms - as fun as that always seems to me. I've been in my wonderful rent stabilized center/north slope apartment for 12 years and if there is one thing I've learned it is how cyclical trends are (and repetitive). The fact of the matter is we just happen to be on a major Breeder Migratory Path - where you will find young single people, mating and breeding in Manhattan, moving to PS to raise their first one or two toddlers and then permanently moving to New Jersey where the 4-5 bedroom house with large yard in picture perfect bucolic suburbia beckons.

    All of this will pass and we will once again be left with Steve Buscemi buying coffee and danish unimpeded by large infant vehicular traffic at Connecticut Muffin, along with an oversupply of Limousine Liberals who continue to send money to their favorite charity to battle racism but still call the NYPD when they see a black guy on their block.

    And PS will continue to be the PS we have always loved and hated with equal fervor.
  • but my own pet peeve is the people who are so engrossed in their cell phone conversations that they are totally oblivious to their surroundings
    ohhh nooooo, you hate people who use cell phones on the street!

    It would be ignorant of me to think you really felt that way just because they annoy you.

    Your block sounds fantastic, hope I have the same experience while living here.
  • lmboogie wrote: but my own pet peeve is the people who are so engrossed in their cell phone conversations that they are totally oblivious to their surroundings
    ohhh nooooo, you hate people who use cell phones on the street!

    It would be ignorant of me to think you really felt that way just because they annoy you.

    Your block sounds fantastic, hope I have the same experience while living here.

    why is this necessary?
  • "lnelson" wrote: and yes, if don't like children, certain aspects of the neighborhood at this time might be considered annoying. but at the same time, we know from a zillion studies that children raised in stable, middle class homes, surrounded by doting adults who talk to them and expose them to lots of different experiences are more likely to succeed in school and in life than children who come from less. let's not despise parents who are doing what they can to do a good job, nor their children for being privileged.
    Yes but there are now studies (aren't there always studies) being conducted whether this kind of over-indulgant parenting is producing children who are self-centered and ego-maniacs.

    There is good parenting, good enough parenting, neglectful parening and then just plain old CRAZY parenting. I think sometimes PS moms are lumped into the crazy parenting group.
  • lmboogie wrote: based on what I read... they were not blocking the entire sidewalk and it seemed the person posting the original thread was just annoyed at the mere sight of them having a beer and playing cards outside of where they live.
    Come on, at least be honest regarding what your hostile about....you are trying to split hairs to disguise your obvious biases. There is no stroller on earth that is larger then a card table with 4 or 5 people sitting at it (with chairs). As described, the table was in the middle of a 5th Ave (i.e. narrow) sidewalk and the card players were loud and drinking. And despite the fact that you get "annoyed" at "tourists", "strollers" and "can't tolerate" "upper middle classs white people" because they have "more of a sense of entitlement" (May 30 5:21am) - you have no problem with people co-oping virtually an entire sidewalk for themselves.
    -Try all you want but it is clear that your hostility has much less to do with what people are doing and much more to do with WHO the people are who are doing it.
    and BTW - thats fine, just be upfront about it,
    Rose wrote: On the diversity/"real people" issue, my South Slope block has a mix of ... We have a fashion magazine editor and people who breed pit bulls in their backyard. .
    Sorry but that is my pet peeve...talk about degenerates...just what NYC needs another backyard Pit breeder. With thousands of Pitbulls being put down in shelters and thousands more being mistreated and neglected everyday , It is truly hard to think of a more discusting way to make a living.
  • why is this necessary?

    Why is what necessary?
  • your snarky comments to rose, when she was just talking about how she likes her street
  • friendlypitbull wrote:
    Sorry but that is my pet peeve...talk about degenerates...just what NYC needs another backyard Pit breeder. With thousands of Pitbulls being put down in shelters and thousands more being mistreated and neglected everyday , It is truly hard to think of a more discusting way to make a living.
    I don't think they made a living at it, I think it was just an occasional thing. Actually, I don't think they are breeding dogs anymore -- we used to hear little puppy yips from their backyard but it's been a couple of years. They do have one of those fierce-looking pits but the dog is never off-leash. I do agree with you about backyard breeding.

    Livetotravel, I think your observation about the Breeder Migratory Path was totally on-target at one point, and still is true to some extent, but much less than in the past. I think a lot more people are now choosing to stay and raise their families here. The people who post on the PS Parents listserv about moving to the suburbs usually express a lot of angst about it -- they would prefer to stay in the city but can't afford it -- rather than having always had the ultimate plan of moving to the burbs for the green lawns and good schools.

    I think it makes for a better neighborhood when you have people of all age groups living together. I think that's healthier than city neighborhoods of hipsters and suburban neighborhoods of young families, and "adult communities" of aging baby boomers. When did it become desirable for society to be so stratified?
  • brooklynpotter wrote: your snarky comments to rose, when she was just talking about how she likes her street
    It's cool, I didn't take it that way, though I appreciate you sticking up for me. :D
  • I wasn't being snarky about the street she lives in. I really do hope I have moved to a neighborhood that is as diverse as she describes her block.

    I was being snarky about the cell phone because it seems to me if you comment on something annoying you then you automatically "hate" it.
  • actually, i hate the way a lot of people use/talk on their cell phones, so i won't even say it just annoys me. but rose is far more agreeable than i am
  • I love the Slope because it has 4 great qualities:
    it's beautiful, it's lively, it's a great place to live, and it makes assholes purple-faced with rage.

    [Edited to clarify: I meant to say "my living here makes assholes purple-faced with rage." Though, hell, maybe the actual physical neighborhood itself sets some people off. One never knows nowadays. Anyway, the fact that some don't think my kind belong here is just a little icing on the cake; I'd love it even without that. For me, it's the human-sized architecture, the park and the Botanic Garden, the feeling that, 30 minutes from midtown Manhattan, I'm in another, better world, the general neighborliness... and all the other young families. :twisted: :twisted: :twisted:]
  • I FUCKING LOVE LIVING IN PARK SLOPE!!!
  • I love the park, the low-rise buildings, being able to see the sky, the beautiful brownstone blocks, the raffish charm of the mix-and-match architecture of the south slope, being able to buy milk and beer on the corner, being able to walk to good restaurants. I love that my kids can have the independence to walk around and take public transportation and not have to sit at home waiting for a ride to the mall.
  • i like that there's nice people in the slope like rose seems to be.

    you rock, rose.
  • can't tolerate" "upper middle classs white people
    If you're going to quote me then at least put into context, don't just pick a sentence that appears to reinforce your point.

    Although I"m not white, my income alone puts me in the "upper class" status. Not middle but upper. I'm not bragging just letting you know that I can relate to human nature... you certainly feel entitlement if you have the upper hand. You can also feel entitlement if you are at the other end of the spectrum. I've felt both so the key is to fight it and try to be as humble as possible.

    Not sure if this makes me biased but I do have a soft spot for any group of people who historically have gotten the shit end of the stick.

    Here's a quote I'm sure will be used at some point. African Americans, Native Americans and Hispanics in this country have historically gotten the shit end of the stick.
  • Subject: Lets get our definitions straight here ...

    It's almost impossible to make a point on this board without someone attacking your point of view. Can't we all just get along?

    The REAL BROOKLYN

    1) Tolerance
    2) Diversity
    3) Love
    4) Community
    5) Toughness

    Anything else is somewhere else, and not our problem.

    And yes, whether your a new arrival, or you have been here for years, there has always been someone before you, and its up to you to make it work. I've been here from my beginnings, and I don't mind other people moving into the neighborhood one bit. Anyone who states they hate new arrivals because they are different then the people before them shouldn't be in Brooklyn in the first place. It should be remembered, the 1970's "white flight" was the opportunity of a lifetime for people who did not mind living with others. Those people were practically giving their buildings away. It was "insane!" (Crazy Eddie)

    Live with others, be tolerant, and stop hating mothers with children. If most of you were here in the 1980's, you'd wish that was the biggest problem you had; suckers.

    Just keep Brooklyn Brooklyn.

    Charlesbklyn
  • belzjm wrote: i like that there's nice people in the slope like rose seems to be.

    you rock, rose.
    Aw, that's sweet. I'm not really that nice. And my kids are among those annoying teenagers congregating on 7th Avenue and in the Tea Lounge. But I do clean up after my dogs. :)
  • [quote="lmboogie"]

    Not sure if this makes me biased but I do have a soft spot for any group of people who historically have gotten the shit end of the stick.

    Here's a quote I'm sure will be used at some point. African Americans, Native Americans and Hispanics in this country have historically gotten the shit end of the stick.
    and so have asians, jews, and gays and women. and now, after 9/11, middle easterners. so basically, you have a soft spot for anyone who isn't white.

    i'm not baiting you, honestly. but it makes me insane when people don't realize that at some point or another each of us has faced adversity because of who we are and what we look like. [/b]
  • Brilliant, thanks for starting this thread.

    I love Park Slope because after 2 years of living in a high rise in Tribeca, I never had a neighbor say "good morning" yet the first day I moved into this Brownstone 2 neighbors came down to welcome me with sweets in hand.

    I love Park Slope because I can run to the Tasty Delight at 10PM in my sweats and no one looks twice.

    Have to get back to work but I'll be back with more later tonight.
  • We should start a new thread if this is turning into a race /socio-economic discussion.

    Obviously we all face adversity but there is no question that some continue to have it harder than others based on who they are and what they look like. No question!
  • I love that I can sit in my garden and work from home on Friday's instead of sitting in a tiny bedroom with my laptop on my bed because there was no room for desk.
  • Rose wrote: And my kids are among those annoying teenagers congregating on 7th Avenue
    Can you tell them and their friends to be a bit, um, less noisy at night? I'm on 7th / 1st and I've had to call 311 on them. I don't mind them hanging out, but they do get raucous.
  • Sorry, those are someone else's kids. Mine are only outside being annoying in the afternoons. At night, they are home annoying me.
  • Rose wrote: At night, they are home annoying me.
    #-o
  • Why do people love short buildings so much again?
  • Because you can see the sky. Because there's more sunlight. Because there are fewer people in them, so you know everybody in your building. Because brownstones are still urban, but not monolithic.

    At least, that's why I like them.
  • laura wrote: I've lived in the Slope for 15 years. I've really loved it but now I'm starting to hate it because it's become so fashionable that I'm getting priced out ... the company that took over my building is now charging $2000 for 500 sq ft apartments with no closets. :roll: The real estate greed around here is leaving a bad taste in my mouth.
    I hope you don't have to move. What are you looking for, in what price range? Maybe someone here will know of something.

    I also hate the fact that friends of mine have been priced out of the neighborhood. (I've lived here about exactly as long as you have.) And it's mainly only by luck (buying early) that I haven't. But I don't get how charging the market rate for an apartment = "greed." Any more than charging the market rate for a steak, or a bunch of flowers, or a pair of shoes.

    In any case the whole cost-of-living issue proves why the "everyone hates Park Slope" idea is so silly.

    Why does everyone hate Park Slope? Because it's so expensive. In other words, why does everyone hate Park Slope? Because so many people want to live there!

    Do they all hate themselves?
  • Ugh. If I had half a brain, I'd leave this moronic topic alone. Alas, I guess I don't have half a brain. Which is probably quite apparent by this time.

    Anyway, Charles, your post says it all, and much better than I could. (And I love your icon. Where'd you get it, if you don't mind my asking?)

    I'm a relative newcomer -- only been here about 18 years. But I know lots of old-timers who've been here 30, 40, 50 years or longer. And you know what? Every single one of them is white and raised a family here. And that makes sense. Because the big secret no one is supposed to say is: Though PS has had wild economic ups and downs in the last 130 years or so, it was always majority white and it was always basically a family neighborhood. So this idea that whites and families are moving in and destroying the "realness" and the hipster-single golden age of Park Slope doesn't wash. If you'd been here in 1920 or 1940 or 1960, you would have seen just as many strollers, only they would have been baby carriages and they would've taken up even more of the sidewalk than the hated Bugaboos.

    If you just hate kids and mothers and families, fine. That's your right. I recommend that anyone who feels that way move to Sarasota or somewhere you can hang with the old folks who hate "those damn kids" as much as you do. It's the best thing you can do for your own sanity, because the families are probably here to stay. I know mine is. :twisted:
This discussion has been closed.