Fire fighter dies tonight in Crown Heights - Brooklynian

Comments

  • Saw this on the news this morning- SO incredibly sad: wife, 1 year-old and another on the way- I can't even imagine what's she's going through...my heart and prayers go out to her and their families.

    A FIRE SAFETY NOTE (while I'm here): the front door to the apartment on fire was LEFT OPENED thus creating more smoke and fire (oxygen anyone?), trapping other residents in their apartments, resulting in death and multiple injuries to both fire fighters and residents.
  • I find it pretty disturbing that a Firefighter dies in the Line of Duty protecting you and I and theres very little sentiment or responses to this thread. I guess people see it as just a "JOB". It's sad that these kids will grow up without a Father. Firefighters and Police put their lives on the line every day for strangers, and the reality of the situation is that most really dont care!
  • I disagree with that. The amount of 911 tributes I see to firefighters and police even now is incredible. People care. Maybe you'll see more responses over the weekend, or on Monday. It is friday night, you know (though it was posted Thursday night. same logic applies).
  • You know, as is often the case with the topic of death and how people handle it- most just don't know how. They are also faced with their own mortality and people generally don't like to think about that as well.

    Go easy KWAK- I'm sure its not that they don't care- death is the end result for all of us, and most just don't like to go there......but I hear you.
  • I understand what you guys are saying, but I find it strange that a "steaming turd" thread gets more press on here.
  • I actually saw this story on the news last night and thought to myself "what a hero" and said a condolence (in my head) to his family. I do care and appreciate the heroism that takes place every day in our community. However, like a previous poster alluded to, I tend to keep my sentiments private.

    In defense of the silent -- it is difficult to express something like this in this type of forum without coming across as cheesy or insincere. It took me a while to even figure out how to craft this post.

    But you do have a point, KWAC. It's not that difficult for me to "publically" recognize this man who lost his life protecting me and my neighbors. We do take people like him for granted. Thanks for the kick in the butt.

    And again, thank you, Lt. Martinson. My condolences to the family.
  • That was very nice! Unfortunately there are still many more forgotten heroes! ******** RIP LT Martinson ***********
  • True. And the fact that the men and women in these roles get slave wages as well as bad raps (sometimes), I can see how it can be a total insult to injury when there is not more public expression in regards to the fact that they put their lives on the line as their JOB (imagine you guys, just simmer on that one- most of us would NEVER). Let alone the ultimate sacrifice - dying to save our (sometimes completely) ungrateful asses.

    I think your pic says it all- in fact, whenever I see it, I do indeed "never forget." It shouldn't apply to just that day.
  • When I saw this post, I didn't comment, not because I wasn't moved, because I was, but because I didn't feel like I had anything constructive to add. I mean, what CAN you say in the face of that?
  • I know death is an uncomfortable topic for most of us, however paying our respect to those that have made the ultimate sacrifice, is something that means alot to the family and friends of mourners. To say that discussing death, or even not paying our respects to the dead, because it reminds us of our own mortality, is simply an inexcusable copout!
  • King without a crown wrote: To say that discussing death, or even not paying our respects to the dead, because it reminds us of our own mortality, is simply an inexcusable copout!
    C'mon man, it's not a copout necessarily, people just don't know what to say or how to say it. They feel they they'll say something wrong so they don't say anything at all. It can seem pretty lame, I know, and as people age and more people around us die, we get more accustomed to dealing and expressing condolences. Young people are generally HORRIBLE at supporting those who have suffered the loss of a loved one. They simply have little or no experience.

    In our culture death isn't generally seen as a "celebration of life" or "moving on to the next life." We in the Western Hem have "heaven"- a very vague place or state of being. And when someone dies before their time? We just have no definitive way of coping- and when individuals come face to face with it, they are left to decide on their own how to deal. And the way one person deals with death may not coincide with others, so many people figure, "the less I say, the better. I won't upset them."

    In reality though, we NEED to talk about it out loud. When we speak about those who have passed on with the ones who are still here, it keeps the memory alive- which aside from pics/videos, is all we have. You wouldn't believe how much the families and close friends appreciate it.

    I've been to many wakes and funerals and I always try to share a story of that person- something funny or meaningful. Laughter through tears, while extremely painful, is also therapeutic.
  • I heard about this on the news in the morning after the fireman died. While getting ready for work I stopped and literally cried when they talked about his family. I wondered what the fireman's wife would do, and hoped that she had support. I thought of firemen that I know personally and hoped that they and their families are all okay.
    It did not occur to me for a moment to share my feelings on this board.
  • My heart goes out to LT. Martinson's family, friends, and coworkers. I have the utmost respect for firemen, when everyone is running out of a burning building they're the ones running in. Every time I see a fire truck on the way to a fire my heart stops. Having fled a fire in my building in the middle of the night, I know how terrifying it was. I can't believe there are people willing to risk their lives to save people from fires. They are true heroes and I will always be grateful to them.
  • lots of people die everyday who have made others' lives better. just because it's a cop or firefighter, we shouldn't be guilted into making some statement about their sacrifice. do we tributize oil rig workers and those on alaskan fishing boats?- far more deadly jobs that contribute greatly to our culture. do cops/firefighters even genuinely care about our society, or do they take the job for other reasons? like ego, self-esteem issues, a paycheck, no degree required, etc?
  • This is not about comparing whose job is more dangerous. Oil rig workers do not put their lives on the line every single day to help complete strangers. As for Cops and Firefighters caring about Society, you better believe they do. It's certainly not the salary that that entices these Men and Women to take the job. I wonder what field of work you're in, and what supreme sacrifices you've made for Society. It's very easy to criticize, but very fiew would do these jobs for even a million dollars. So take your sentiment somewhere else, or start a new thread if you'd like. Atleast have a little respect for the man and his family. He hasn't even been laid to rest yet.

    P.S. If you'd like I can post the funeral arrangements so you can share your views with his coworkers and family.
  • I appreciate where you are coming from KWAC, but sentiment is cheap. Castigating us for not posting is stupid. Personally, I feel the worst thing I can do is go out of my way to express condolences to people I don't know. It just cheapens it somehow. I don't know this person, yet I'm supposed to approach his family and tell them how sorry I am for their loss. It's an appropriate thing to do should I come across them, but to just show up?

    I've been the bereaved party at large funerals before and it sucks. When my grandfather died, because my step-grandmother ran the Republican party in Colorado, as part of the receiving line, my dad and I had to shake hands with EVERY politician from that state. (They all stuck out their hands and announced their names, "JAMES NIGHTHORSE CAMPBELL" like they expected us to vote for them.) It was AWFUL. My dad was bawling and simultaneously ashamed of his tears because in the Rocky Mountains of the '50s when he grew up, boys didn't cry. And we had to shake all those hands of people we didn't know. It just made the whole thing worse.

    On the other hand, my grandmother had a small funeral when she died and it was lovely. Everyone who attended knew and loved her, except for the two cops who attended. They were too young to have known her, but they came because as mayor of Newark Delaware, she did so much for the city. That meant a lot, particularly because they spent much of the time keeping the ghastly memorial display my aunt made upright. Everyone else there knew the deceased well enough to share stories about her. I found this ceremony much more meaningful and healing as a result.

    Does it really matter if we post our condolences? Does the widow even read and/or post here? If she did, then that would change matters. I still wouldn't feel that my presence would be mandated at the funeral, but I would definitely express my condolences here.
  • No one is soliciting insincere condolences, my comment was in reference to the fact that very few people either read the thread, nor had any comments. On the flipside, posts about "steaming turds" or "guess whose gonna post next" seem to get alot of views and responses. If the "worst thing you can do" is express condolences for someone who has risked their life day in and day out to save either yourself or others in your Community, than keep your friggin condolences!!!!
  • See? This whole exchange just proves my point- death is a touchy subject.

    Let love rule!
  • teddybearspicnics don't forget that this fallen hero worked in your neighborhood. His job as to keep YOU DIRECTLY safe. You do not have to feel bad,but show some f#$king respect. You're right many people die every day, but not every day do the people that have taken job to protect you die. Next time that you have a water leak, gas leak or god forbid a fire the men that worked with this fallen hero will be the ones that are running into your apartment.
  • teddybearspicnics wrote: lots of people die everyday who have made others' lives better. just because it's a cop or firefighter, we shouldn't be guilted into making some statement about their sacrifice. do we tributize oil rig workers and those on alaskan fishing boats?- far more deadly jobs that contribute greatly to our culture. do cops/firefighters even genuinely care about our society, or do they take the job for other reasons? like ego, self-esteem issues, a paycheck, no degree required, etc?
    *************************
    I guess you feel they are illiterate and expendable, so who gives a shit if they die trying to do right for others.
    If you ever have the need to require the service of either a Fireman or Police Officer make sure you stipulate they send someone with a degree or better yet call an Alaskan fisherman or Oil Rigger
  • I've often wished there were some kind of hand gesture I could use that means "thank you" or "be safe". I don't see many firemen on the street but I'd love to let them know I appreciate them when they drive by in their trucks. I feel a wave is inadequate and I wouldn't want them to think I'm just flirting or something.
  • [quote="caseopele"]I've often wished there were some kind of hand gesture I could use that means "thank you" or "be safe". I don't see many firemen on the street but I'd love to let them know I appreciate them when they drive by in their trucks. I feel a wave is inadequate and I wouldn't want them to think I'm just flirting or something.[/quote
    **********************
    A wave is not inadequate ,it is an acknowledgment that is well received
  • Hamilton wrote: [quote=teddybearspicnics]lots of people die everyday who have made others' lives better. just because it's a cop or firefighter, we shouldn't be guilted into making some statement about their sacrifice. do we tributize oil rig workers and those on alaskan fishing boats?- far more deadly jobs that contribute greatly to our culture. do cops/firefighters even genuinely care about our society, or do they take the job for other reasons? like ego, self-esteem issues, a paycheck, no degree required, etc?
    *************************
    I guess you feel they are illiterate and expendable, so who gives a shit if they die trying to do right for others.
    If you ever have the need to require the service of either a Fireman or Police Officer make sure you stipulate they send someone with a degree or better yet call an Alaskan fisherman or Oil Rigger

    No- maybe i was sort of harsh, but I don't like people being chastised for not honoring someone quick enough just because of their job title. There's been a huge outpouring of respect and dignity towards firefighters and police since 9/11, but I think it should be an organic and natural process- as it generally has been and rightfully so. When you start pressuring society to respond a certain way- without knowing the person who died, plus considering the thousands who die everyday constantly, it seems to cheapen things by making demands or claims of insensitivity. Also, maybe people didn't click on the link or respond to the subject that much because they come here for a bit of an escape. People can choose to honor people who have died in these fields through other ways- like charity or funds or parades(?). Obviously no one wants these sorts of things to happen, but why inflame feelings with what I see as greater insensitivity?
  • King without a crown wrote: I find it pretty disturbing that a Firefighter dies in the Line of Duty protecting you and I and theres very little sentiment or responses to this thread. I guess people see it as just a "JOB". It's sad that these kids will grow up without a Father. Firefighters and Police put their lives on the line every day for strangers, and the reality of the situation is that most really dont care!
    This board is mostly a place where people seem to come to argue things or get opinions and this is a subject where most people probably have similar feelings, thus not much to argue or discuss. Notice that the recent activity is people bantering. A serious subject like this one doesn't leave much room to really be snide :wink:
  • Sometimes NOT commenting can be a form of respect. There is nothing I can say that would satisfy KWAC, but the fact is, having been a bereaved party, I HATED having total strangers coming up to me to express condolences. I HATED having to shake hands with all those politicians who didn't give a rat's ass about my grandfather and were only at his funeral because he was married to someone politically powerful.

    I have no wish to impose on another person's private grief and I think a firefighter's family (especially a firefighter's family) is entitled to respect and privacy at that time without having total strangers bow obeisance for the deceased having been a firefighter. Condolences from people who actually knew the man even in the slightest way mean a lot more.

    However, if KWAC wanted to start a fund for the firefighter's family or to put out a call for easily freezable dishes to stock their refrigerator, well THAT is a concrete thing we can do to help strangers we don't know. Those are gestures that would always be appreciated.
  • This is incredibly sad and my heart goes out to his family.

    I heard on the CW11 news that the fire started because there was no heat in the building, the family had the stove on for heat, and a little boy ignited something on the stove. They interviewed other tenants in the Ebbets Field houses and they said the lack of heat was not unusual. Anyone hear any more about that?

    Granted, the same thing could have happened when the stove was being used for cooking. But what a preventable tragedy in this case. The landlord should be brought up on criminal charges.
  • http://www.ny1.com/ny1/content/index.jsp?&aid=77152&search_result=1&stid=9
    Fire officials told NY1 the family that lived in the apartment was using the stove to heat it.
    They say a six-year-old child put a piece of wrapping paper into the flame, and when it caught fire – to avoid getting in trouble – he stuck it under the bed.

    Fire Department sources say the door to the apartment where the fire started was left open, which allowed the blaze to spread.
  • Ugh, what a horrible story, for the firefighter, and for the family whose apartment caught fire.
    There is nothing I can say that would satisfy KWAC, but the fact is, having been a bereaved party, I HATED having total strangers coming up to me to express condolences.
    lilbangladesh, why do you keep nattering on about this? KWAC never suggested that anybody on this board should express condolences to the firefighter's family; he merely expressed dismay that so few people made comments IN THIS THREAD. If I'm not mistaken, KWAC even came back to clarify that, and yet you go on arguing against something he didn't say ...
This discussion has been closed.