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The ground floor of the building at the NW corner of Franklin and EP — Brooklynian

The ground floor of the building at the NW corner of Franklin and EP

Formerly the site of Yogu Moo Sign went up today.     The people putting up the sign said it is going to be a clothing store.image image

Part of me suspects that they have not taken down the Yogu Moo sign because their ladder is too short.
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Comments


  • Now open.

    Screen shot 2015-04-06 at 9.15.19 PM
  • Walked by yesterday. The store is stocked and looks pretty nice. I wanted to walk in just to check out the prices (just to see *how* expensive the clothes are) but refrained. I wonder how profitable a high-end clothing shop will be. The clothes look trendy and expensive. Is Franklin Ave a shopping destination?
  • Came back to comment that the Yogo Moo sign is still up. It is such a nice sign too, with the wood custom-cut to fit the nooks in the façade.
  • edited April 2015
    Locally, my favorite "legacy sign" is at 349 Flatbush Avenue, near Park Place. At some point in the distant past, one could get Briggs & Stratton small engines repaired...

    Streetview: http://goo.gl/maps/Xgmhl

    Now, one can merely get mexican and chinese food.
  • I stopped by, tried some things on, didn't purchase. The clothes are indeed, quite lovely- she's curated well. Average price for a blouse/dress is about $80-ish. I did find a dress that was $55. Scarves were $35. Shirts varied based on the material. All the clothes come from Paris or Italy. Something to keep in mind- ALL the clothes hanging were O/S (one size). That said, as a curvy girl, I did actually find things that fit me (a O/S from Paris that FIT ME??? Zomg!) 

    Shop owner is a local resident- she was very nice. 
  • I went in on Sunday and ended up buying a couple of things. I thought the prices were fair for the product; not inexpensive, but certainly less than a similar type of boutique would charge in a wealthier area of town. There's not all that much shopping on Franklin, compared to the number of other types of storefronts, so I hope it does well.

    Like whatchuwant mentioned, most everything appeared to be O/S, but cut in a way that would fit a variety of sizes and body types. That should keep cost and risk down for the merchants (a boon for a new business) and still serve a variety of clientele. I'm on the larger end of the size spectrum, and I didn't feel put off by the place.
  • edited March 2016
    Now reportedly closed.   Seems to have lasted exactly one year.

  • Seems having a clothing boutique is a bad idea here.  Looks like they all close in short time. 

    Ideas:  donut shop, vape shop (i know its polarizing, but the trend is still growing), bike mechanic, old fashioned cobbler :)

    DOA ideas;  mexican, cafe, clothing
  • edited March 2016

    I think the neighborhood now has enough children that a traditional ice cream shop could survive at this location.

    Ben and Jerry's

    Baskin Robin

    ...YoGu Moo failed at this location because it didn't have enough seating, had strange hours and the neighborhood did not yet have enough parents with money and small children.

    It is a new day.


  • A great cobbler would be fantastic. 

    Says the girl who just brought her grandma's furs to one of Brooklyn's last furriers, Hyman Kernser in Bensonhurst. I love fixing old things.
  • I think they could take the roof off of that storefront space and turn it into a courtyard with outdoor seating for whatever shop is next to it, and then transfer their square footage up to the top of the building for a penthouse apartment.

    Alternatively, it'd be a pretty sweet subway entrance. And building a subway entrance would buy them more square footage for even more penthouse apartments on top of the building.
  • I was surprised it lasted that long. Always empty. Expensive. Not that many items.
  • It may have lasted that long because they were able to negotiate an exit after 1 year 
  • Didn't realize they were expensive, because I'm a guy, which is part of their problem.  You cleave off half your potential clientele in a niche business and it doesn't bode well.  
  • nice. a clothing store. hopefully inexpensive. 
  • I stopped by, tried some things on, didn't purchase. The clothes are indeed, quite lovely- she's curated well. Average price for a blouse/dress is about $80-ish. I did find a dress that was $55. Scarves were $35. Shirts varied based on the material. All the clothes come from Paris or Italy. Something to keep in mind- ALL the clothes hanging were O/S (one size). That said, as a curvy girl, I did actually find things that fit me (a O/S from Paris that FIT ME??? Zomg!) 

    Shop owner is a local resident- she was very nice. 
    wow. $55 for a dress isnt TOO bad. 
  • I heard through the grapevine that the space is going to be a cheese shop related to Wino(t). Hopefully they have other kinds of specialty foods, too, because cheese alone seems like kind of a long shot to sustain a Franklin storefront.
  • I contacted Winot and they state said rumor has no validity.

  • edited March 2016
    They've got employees running around starting rumors, then.
  • Real Estate office took it.
  • A big name too
  • edited May 2016
    That makes sense.    Very visible location that does not allow cooking.   Hopefully I can get a photo of yet another sign being erected...
  • BOOOOO!  Real estate.  The slow and steady Park Slopization of Franklin Ave.
  • That's ok. Park slope is a great place to raise a fam.
  • edited May 2016
    I suspect the real estate place will be image conscious enough to take down the signs advertising Yogu Moo and Tendenci.

    ....but a small part of me would like all signs to remain in place for 5 years.

    It might give pause to aspiring small business owners.
  • Who is it Corcoran?
  • The paper has been taken down from the windows. The sign is up. The new tenant is indeed a real estate office. 

    And it is...



  • It's also worth pointing out their other physical locations: https://www.compass.com/about/offices. Mostly all high-end areas. Really interesting move beating Corcoran here.
  • edited June 2016
    I think of their locations as high end and YOUNG (28 - 38)

    .... I see Corcoran as focusing on slightly older buyers and locations.