Chester Court pedestrian bridge? - Brooklynian

Chester Court pedestrian bridge?

Off-the-wall idea here:
It's a half mile from Lincoln to Parkside, and people wishing to get to the park from in between have to choose one or the other. 
Chester Court is half way in between. It's a dead end street, ending in a brick wall and the Q train tracks. 
On the other side is Ocean on the Park, the landmarked houses, as well as, just a few feet north, 185 Ocean Avenue, a condo building with a driveway and parking in the back. 
So in theory, if money, building codes, the city, and zoning were no object, one could build a very short pedestrian/bike bridge over the Q tracks, from the end of Chester Court, to the parking lot and driveway of Ocean on the Park, and connect all of Lefferts Manor directly to the park. 
Can you use eminent domain for this?

Comments

  • edited November 2015
    There seems to be buildings in the way.     Perhaps you could buy one of the row houses on the other side of the tracks and then hollow out the first floor to allow people to walk thru after they cross the bridge.

  • They just need to build the bridge at a diagonal, from Chester Court to 185 Ocean. No buildings in the way there. 
  • edited November 2015

    The distance is close enough that it could be achieved via human cannon.    We'd set up two:  one on Chester Court to go to the park, and the other in the park to come back.   

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DJ79-rq55Vc


  • i have a friend who lives in that condo building; it seems physically feasible but a logistical nightmare. first, you'd need permission probably from both the condo building and the neighboring house since they seem to share that driveway. and since it would have to be built diagonally that means it would probably be a much harder structure to support given the length and everything. no, i actually like the fact that whole stretch is not accessible to the park easily. so you have to walk an extra 1/4 of a mile in the worst case; big deal. to me it seems like the tiniest payback for the people who get to live in fancy manor buildings on rutland and fenimore

    still, maybe you should suggest it to Hudson companies. they're probably the people with the most cash and would actually stand to gain something from this as their building would suddenly have super easy (albeit creepy at night) park access
  • "you'd need permission probably from both the condo building and the neighboring house since they seem to share that driveway"

    The owners of the neighboring house seemed obsessed with their driveway during the building of the condo and the landmarking process for Ocean on the Park. I doubt that permission would be possible. Also I think the landmark status would nix Whynot's idea about hollowing out an Ocean Ave. house (which, I suspect, was as tongue-in-cheek as his human cannon idea).
  • edited November 2015
    BTW, I live in Lefferts Manor and don't mind walking to Lincoln Rd. to get to the park.
  • edited November 2015

    Land marking does present a problem.

    And, given local fire codes, a catapult may be more more feasible than a cannon.    Let's give this guy a call: 

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OIK0SZBoBvg

  • Whoever lives in the house should just pay for the bridge and then charge a toll.
  • Wouldn't the MTA be involved because this theoretical bridge would go over its tracks? Air rights? 
  • edited November 2015
    I think it is safe to assume that they are going to want everyone who crosses the bridge to have an EZpass or Metrocard.
  • whynot_31 said:

    I think it is safe to assume that they are going to want everyone who crosses the bridge to have an EZpass or Metrocard.

    Built-in congestion pricing. LOL
  • Bikers are going to complain that they didn't get their own lane.

    People with disabilities are going to want the access way to be at least 36" wide, without steps, and have a 3% grade or less.

    Advocates for the elderly are going to want benches every 100 feet, while other people are going to be opposed to benches because they potentially provide comfort to unsightly homeless people. 

    Design and public comment period: 3 years.

    Time needed to secure funding:  4 years

    Date of completion:  2023.

    Cost:   $22 Million

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