Neighborhood Watch - Brooklynian

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Neighborhood Watch

Does anyone know of one ever forming in Crown Heights? Does anyone have interest in exploring starting one? Would seem to be a proactive step that could be taken that would not be reactive (like protests after an incident happens), and would therefore stand at least some small chance of successfully preventing crime.
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  • Kingston Avenue between Empire and Eastern Parkway has Shomrim. They are very active. https://www.facebook.com/crownheights.shomrim/
  • Thanks. I wonder if a neighborhood watch group could be started in the non-Hasidic areas (where there is crime).
  • Yeah yeah best intentions and all, but no way does this not turn into helping the NYPD continue to criminalize being black and/or poor.
  • Not to be coy, but the neighborhood does have lots of cameras that record just about everything. ...the neighborhood is already watching and being watched.
  • Sure. But having actual people out and present and watching is a proven crime deterrent. Curious if folks in the area would be interested, people that care about their community and want to do something proactive vs. reactive
  • edited September 22
    How would would one propose to recruit people for this neighborhood watch?

    Why not invite in the Guardian Angels?

  • Maybe brand it less of a neighborhood watch, and do more of a "Crown Heights Concerned Citizens" and organize a few events to get people together (like a block clean-up, or fall bulb planting, or something?) Then you can gauge interest in seeing if people want to or have experience with neighborhood watch type things. I know that Prospect Place between Kingston and Albany has (or used to have) an informal system where you could call someone to walk you home from the subway late at night.
  • These things had there place back in the '70s and 80s, but IMO aren't really necessary anymore. We had one in PLG, called the Committee for Neighborhood Improvement and Safety [CNIS] that was quite effective. However, it disbanded in the early '90s because it was no longer really needed. In the late '90s someone got up at a Lefferts Manor Association meeting I was running and asked why we didn't have a patrol. I'm generally sick of people who ask "why don't you guys....?" So I challenged him to organize it. To my great surprise he DID so, quite effectively, with the cooperation of the 71st Pct. However, it dissolved about a year later, having NEVER ONCE observed a crime in progress. Crime rates now are even lower than they were 20 years ago.
  • As I look through the Shomrim page, their work seems to be mostly in response to people calling them for assistance. They serve a community that believes that they often have a better response time than the police. They also serve a neighborhood that borders a neighborhood with a much lower income, making crime (and the fear of crime...) more of an issue than it is in much of Crown Heights. https://www.facebook.com/crownheights.shomrim/
  • edited September 25
    I doubt that the Shomrim, or their rivals, the Shmira, are a good model to follow.
  • Me either. I was just listing some of the factors that cause their existence, while hinting that west of Nostrand has very few of them.
  • What would it watch for? The shootings are gang-related and I doubt the gangs would be impressed or deterred by a neighborhood watch. Even these are rare, and to bobmarvin’s point, there is not exactly a staggering amount of crime worth watching.
  • It could watch for new restaurants and building permits. It could chart the increase in condo prices on a per sq ft basis, and watch local politicians change their message based on which parts of the neighborhood they think are listening and watching.
  • Given it some thought. Some blocks have a bit of a dog shit problem. That could use some watching.
  • Welcome to the Neighborhood Watch, boys!
  • whynot_31 said:
    It could watch for new restaurants and building permits. It could chart the increase in condo prices on a per sq ft basis, and watch local politicians change their message based on which parts of the neighborhood they think are listening and watching.
    Sounds like this website is the neighborhood watch. Not sure how much we deter crime, but love the hyper-local intel.
  • ...some readers and writers have done more than their part.
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